Document - A Paddler's Guide to the Olympic Peninsula

Abstract

Paddling a new river is one of my life's most fulfilling experiences. I seem to go into sensory perception overload as I try to deal with the challenge of the river combined with the hypnotizing scenery. With ouzels and otter as my guides, I cruise through mysterious gorges and eat lunch among massive, old-growth Sitka spruce. This is my Disneyland, a place where I can go to escape the real world. Unfortunately, the real world is encroaching on the vulnerable Olympic Peninsula. Greedy people are already fighting over securing rights for water projects on most of the rivers. As you read this 500-year-old trees are dropping, changing the entire climate along the river corridors. Fortunately, we had the foresight to protect some of this unique treasure with Olympic National Park. This area insures that we and future generations can experience nature and it's humbling powers. This can help us to put our own lives into perspective. Some of the runs in this book are so beautiful they are beyond description. When I first paddled in the Olympics I was stunned. I wondered why I'd never seen pictures or heard stories about these rivers. I had traveled allover looking for this kind of boating and was usually disappointed. This obsession with Peninsula rivers is what prompted me to write a guide book. In November of 1982 I started writing run descriptions and had my first book done in the fall of 1986. Then in 1992 the second edition came out. Now in 1997 I've come out with the third edition. One thing I've learned in this time is how fast the rivers of the Olympics are changing. I have tried to update the runs and shuttles as much as possible, but I realize the rivers and roads are changing with every big storm that blows through. It has been a lot of work. Since 1984 I've been paddling over 100 days a year. In 1994 it reached an all-time high: 161 days. I'll be checking into a recovery and rehabilitation center sometime soon. Some of these days have been spent riding a bicycle up and down bumpy dirt roads to run Class I water with trees to portage every 100 feet. Or just driving in circles, lost on clearcut shuttle roads only to find last months storm washed the road out. But in this time I’ve seen sights few people will ever see; images and experiences that I will cherish for the rest of my life. I wrote this guide book so more people can enjoy the rivers and experience this area as I have. So accept my invitation and join me in seeing some of the most beautiful places on this planet.

Description

A comprehensive guide to 75 river runs on Washington's beautiful Olympic Peninsula.
Document author
Gary Korb
Port Orchard, WA
Phone: 360-876-6780

Document Information

Filename - A Paddler's Guide to the Olympic Peninsula1659.pdf

Size - 10.30MB


Associated Rivers

Baker Creek WA
low
00h40m
Bogachiel WA
low
00h26m
Calawah, S. Fork WA
low
00h26m
Calawah WA
low
00h26m
Canyon River (Satsop trib.) WA
Christmas Creek WA
low
01h10m
low
00h26m
low
01h10m
low
00h40m
Elwha WA
med
00h55m
Elwha WA
med
00h55m
med
00h55m
low
01h10m
Humptulips, E. Fork WA
low
01h10m
Humptulips, E. Fork WA
low
01h10m
Humptulips, W. Fork WA
low
01h10m
low
01h10m
Matheny Creek WA
low
00h26m
low
00h26m
Quinault WA
med
00h26m
Satsop, E. Fork WA
Satsop, Middle Fork WA
low
00h26m
Skokomish, N. Fork WA
low
00h55m
Skokomish, S. Fork WA
low
00h26m
Sol Duc, S. Fork WA
low
00h43m
low
00h26m
Wynoochee WA
low
01h10m