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Difficulty III+(V)
Length 4.55 Miles
Gauge SACANDAGA RIVER NEAR HOPE NY
Flow Range 2800 - 5000 CFS
Flow Rate as of: 1 hour ago 141 [CFS]
Reach Info Last Updated 04/21/2016 2:58 pm

River Description


Directions to putin:
From the NY Thruway (I-90), take Exit 29A. Take NY 169 toward Little Falls, and then quickly grab NY 167 toward Dolgeville.
In Dolgeville, grab NY 29 N toward Salisbury Center for about 4 miles.
Bang a Right onto Rte. 29A/130 (Emmonsburg Rd.) East toward Emmonsburg. After about 4 miles, morph onto Rte. 119 East.
After about 3 miles, bear Left onto Stewarts Landing Rd. It's about 3-4 miles to the dam.
Walk along the trail and put in downstream of the concrete abutment.

To takeout:
Head back on Stewart Landing Rd. and onto Rte. 119 West.
After about 2 miles on 119, head Left onto Kelly Rd.
After a mile, take your first Left onto Youker Rd. Head about a mile upstream, and park at the turn-out. If you have any doubts about finding the takeout from the creek, walk down the trail to see whether anyone's tied anything onto a riverside tree there.

The lat/longitude coords are approximate, from TopoZone. This is a very narrow creeky run; the consensus seems to be that it's mostly class III with a couple of V's (one of which has serious pin danger) sprinkled in. The release comes out of Canada Lake for the fall drawdown.
Put in at Stewart Landing and take out near the bend on Youker Road, about 3/4 mile downstream of the old substation (which is private property, by the way, completely off-limits). Walk a couple hundred feet from the road down to the river to note the location of the takeout.

Mile-by-mile gradient below Stewart Landing: 130, 30, 120, 100, 30 (0.55 mile). A mile that drops 130 feet sounds pretty hefty, and so does the other that drops 120. Note that this gradient seems to have some partial-mile sections that are significantly steeper than 130 ft/mi. Exercise caution!

Here's a lot of beta courtesy of Brianf, of the Northeast Paddlers' Massage Board:

 

Sprite Creek is located about 25 miles northwest of Johnstown, NY.

The creek begins at the dam at the reservoir- scheduled releases are held each fall. The first 1/4 mile of the creek was fun and fairly straight forward; the next 1.5 miles were a combination of class II and class III ledge drops and quick moving green water. The first significant drop was before a tunnel crossing under a road- it was a straightforward boof off a 3-foot whale hump just left of center. We all ran too far left and missed the boof, not wanting to take time to scout the drop.

About 1/2 mile later, there is a river-wide 4-foot ledge, that you boof on the right. The next slide requires a quick look--there are 2 reactionary curlers halfway down the slide, and making an eddy on the left or right is fairly important. The river splits in half here- on the left channel are 2 really nice ledge-drops, the 2nd landing in an aerated pool 15 feet long, just above a 10-foot ledge drop. This drop looked good, but there was only a foot of water in the landing, and you had to nail your line, plus nail the boof, to avoid a nasty rock at the bottom. Feeling confident I could do both, I ended up bailing after receiving some frantic signals from others in my group on river right.

The river-right line starts with a 3-foot ledge drop, leading into a slide, and ending with a slide, about 20 feet long. The bulk of the water feeds into a crack in the slide, slamming into a huge boulder at the bottom, where the slide makes a 45-degree turn. On the left side of the slide, there is a rock flake you can boof, clearing the crack and nasty boulder, although staying upright is necessary. Someone in front of us bow-pinned pretty good in a slot in front of the boulder. I'd rate both lines class IV, including the river-left boof into no water.

About a mile later, after some more class II, III drops, there's a footbridge, and the creek turns 90 degrees to the left. Get out above the footbridge to scout-
Run the rapid leading under the bridge right of center, and eddy out at the bottom of the drop- run the second half of this rapid left of center (there's a foam pile breaking on a wave; your right hip should be on the corner), then drive hard right down the tube down a 10-foot slide (just like Mike Feldman described) and boof the ledge below the slide. You don't want to be flipping at the bottom of the slide- there is no recovery time between the slide and ledge. I'd rate this rapid class IV as well, possibly IV+ at higher flows.

The rest of the run is anticlimactic; tie something in the tree at the takeout unless you're with someone who knows where it is; walking through the woods when you're cold and tired is not how you want to end your day, although having a cold Magic Hat waiting for you quickly makes up for it.

Editor's note: we have no idea what a Magic Hat is.

Todd Morin adds that "it is a very scenic run. After crossing under the road at Rt. 119, the rest of the run is through the woods away from any sign of civilization until you get to the old power station close to the take out."

Mike and Jody Feldman point out that "there is usually quite a bit of logging activity in the area and over the past two years it has reached to the creek side. This past weekend (11/17-18/01), comments were made from some boaters regarding their opposition to logging, especially in a river corridor. I spoke with a friend at DEC and he tells me this is legal, providing they are not dumping snags and waste into the stream. All of the wood in the creek appears to be from the natural erosion process compounded by the seasonal release cycle. Regardless, criticizing the local economy will quickly lead to animosity and access restrictions."

 

Mohawk Valley Area Reaches

Canajoharie Creek                           Caroga Creek                                  Cincinnati Creek 

East Canada Creek                          Fish Creek, E. Branch                     Ninemile Creek  

North Chuctanunda Creek               Nowadaga Creek                             Mohawk (1.)  

Oriskany Creek (Clinton)                  Oriskany Creek (Oriskany Falls)      Schoharie Creek 

Sprite Creek (Upper)                        Sprite Creek (Lower)                       Spruce Creek 

Timmerman Creek                           West Canada Creek 

 

Google Map of New York Whitewater

New York Whitewater Paddlers Facebook Group

Rapid Descriptions

Comments

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8 years ago

"Magic Hat" is simply the name of a good micro brewery.

Gage Descriptions

There's a fall drawdown out of Canada "Lake." That's when this liddle honey runs.
The drawdown begins on November 15 of every year except leap years. On leap years, they do a weekend drawdown on Oct. 15 to allow the landowners along the "lake" to do maintenance on their docks.
Therefore, the release will begin on Nov. 15 of this year (2007). The dam is closed again on May 15, or at ice-out.
After the first couple days of drawdown, the river level becomes rain-dependent until Spring.

Directions Description


Directions to putin:
From the NY Thruway (I-90), take Exit 29A. Take NY 169 toward Little Falls, and then quickly grab NY 167 toward Dolgeville.
In Dolgeville, grab NY 29 N toward Salisbury Center for about 4 miles.
Bang a Right onto Rte. 29A/130 (Emmonsburg Rd.) East toward Emmonsburg. After about 4 miles, morph onto Rte. 119 East.
After about 3 miles, bear Left onto Stewarts Landing Rd. It's about 3-4 miles to the dam.
Walk along the trail and put in downstream of the concrete abutment.

To takeout:
Head back on Stewart Landing Rd. and onto Rte. 119 West.
After about 2 miles on 119, head Left onto Kelly Rd.
After a mile, take your first Left onto Youker Rd. Head about a mile upstream, and park at the turn-out. If you have any doubts about finding the takeout from the creek, walk down the trail to see whether anyone's tied anything onto a riverside tree there.

The lat/longitude coords are approximate, from TopoZone.

 

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Moose River Video

1/18/2011
Mark Singleton

2010 marked the 25th anniversary of protecting the Black and Moose rivers!  View an online video documentary on the Moose River and the early role that American Whitewater played in protecting this amazing river.

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Alex Barham

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Matt Muir

Revisions

Revision #Revision DateAuthorComment
1206271 04/21/16 Alex Barham Added local info
1191219 05/09/08 Matt Muir n/a