Klamath - 02. JC Boyle Dam to Powerhouse


Klamath, Oregon, US

Disclaimer

02. JC Boyle Dam to Powerhouse (JC Boyle bypass)

Usual Difficulty IV+ (for normal flows)
Length 5 Miles
Avg. Gradient 100 fpm

JC Boyle bypass


JC Boyle bypass
Photo by Josh Strange taken 09/15/02



River Description

This is the bypass reach between the JC Boyle Dam and Powerhouse, and you'll be lucky to catch this run with water in it. It only happens when the reservoir is spilling, but when that occurs this run makes a great five mile run with more challenging whitewater and dramatic scenery than the Hell's Corner run downstream. When it has water, this rarely-boated upper section makes a great extension to the Hell's Corner run.

There are nine distinct Class IV rapids in this section, some of which are as much as a half mile in length. At the higher flows of 1300 and 1600 cfs there are numerous play features to catch on the fly as well as several play spots with eddy service. The long rapids with steep horizon lines provide plenty of entertainment for river runners. Overall, this reach has a creek-like appearance in a basalt canyon with ponderosa pines.

American Whitewater worked with Pacificorp, local boaters, and outfitters to coordinate a flow release study on this reach during summer 2002. Hopefully we'll see the day when the river once again provides boating opportunities and improved conditions for the native fishery.


StreamTeam Status: Not Verified
Last Updated: 2018-10-26 16:53:11

Rapid Descriptions

icon of message No rapids entered. If you know names, and locations of the rapids please contact and advise the StreamTeam member for this run.

User Comments

Users can submit comments.

No Comments



Do more than just check gauges; join over 5,000 AW members today.


Or, consider donating


Associated Projects

  • Conservation System
    The National Landscape Conservation System represents the crown jewels of BLM lands and rivers.
  • Klamath Restoration (OR & CA)
    AW supports restoration of the Klamath River for the benefit of salmon while providing appropriate opportunities for whitewater recreation.

Documents