Snowbird Creek - Hooper Bald to Junction


Snowbird Creek, North Carolina, US

Disclaimer

Hooper Bald to Junction (Upper Snowbird)

Usual Difficulty III-IV+ (for normal flows)
Length 8 Miles
Avg. Gradient 137 fpm


River Description

Hike into the Upper Snowbird from the Hooper Bald parking
lot on the Cherohala Skyway. The Upper Snowbird has four
waterfalls in between sections of class III whitewater. The
river then changes into class IV whitewater for the last few
miles. Three of the waterfalls can be found in most senic
waterfall books and are labeled on most maps. Upper falls is a
long slide, Middle falls is a 22' riverwide drop, Big falls is a series
5 or 6 small slides ending with a 10' drop, and the last waterfall
(which is not labeled on the map) is a 4' drop directly on to a 20'
slide. If you are in the area and everything else is too high this
will be a good run.
StreamTeam Status: Not Verified
Last Updated: 2003-01-24 15:34:14

Editors


Rapid Descriptions

icon of message No rapids entered. If you know names, and locations of the rapids please contact and advise the StreamTeam member for this run.

User Comments


2004-09-17 19:27:47 (3501 days ago)
Brad RobertsDetails
snowbird info New [add to watch]

Forum: BoaterTalk
Re: Some questions on Treemont, Ranses cascades, Snowbird creek (in the smokies) otto New
Date: Feb 04 2004, 21:13 GMT
From: southeastcreekin

I ran snowbird by hiking down from the skyway...first of all if you do this start out EARLY..it
takes forever, and you'll need ALOT of water

2nd ...the trail head on the map isn't clearly marked when you get there and takes a little work to
find out where you need to go

once you figure out that you are hiking in the right direction its a long walk..several miles
before you reach the creek..then a little longer before it becomes large enough to put on. (you'll
step over it a couple times while you descend the trail)

you'll paddle alot of flat stuff before reaching the falls..you'll wonder if you are on the right
creek

the waterfalls and slides are GREAT!!!! pretty big and challenging.

then the creek turns into continuous fun class three/four stuff...we got screwed by nightfall and
had to hike out and missed the last half mile or so....

if I were to do it again and had a medium level at the takeout...I'd hike from the bottom until I
reached the big river wide 25-30 footer, and put on above it (it would be a long hike, but an
obvious and straightforward trail)...you won't miss much except for a slide or two, but you'll
spare yourself the hike in from the top, and alot of work. When the bottom half is running medium
the top half won't have much water (tributary effect) and won't be worth the effort (you'll scrape
over alot of stuff)...

NOW if the lower is really high...THEN I would consider hiking in from the top and catching the
waterfall section, because then it would probably be at a good level. However the lower sections
might get kinda out of control and force you to get off and have to hike out...or you could run out
of daylight like we did, so make sure you start EARLY..it takes much longer than it looks like it
would from reading the map...especially if you have to scout.

all in all..I'd probably just hike up and put on when you get tired of walking

want more info..email me (and if you do it..keep your eyes peeled for a small black pelican
box....)

SEC
Users can submit comments.


Do more than just check gauges; join over 5,000 AW members today.


Or, consider donating


Associated Projects

  • Roadless Areas
    Of the 192 million acres the Forest Service manages, 58.5 million is Roadless. Often located at lower elevations, Roadless Areas include scenic landscapes, ancient forests, and wild rivers.