Difficulty III-IV(V)
Length 7.4 Miles
Gauge N/A
Flow Range
Reach Info Last Updated 08/16/2019 4:01 pm

River Description


Granite Creek is an undammed tributary to the Middle Fork San Joaquin River that was first boated in 1999. It is a very pretty and high quality stretch of river, very continuous, but mostly class 3 and 4.




Here is a Trip Report from 2019, flow information from that trip is available in the report.




Getting There: Take Highway 41 through Oakhurst to the Bass Lake turn off. Go to the east side of Bass Lake to Beasore Rd. Drive a long ways to Clover Meadow then follow your map to Granite Creek.

Put - in: From Clover Meadow, drive east 1/3 mile to a fork in the road and turn left onto 5S30. Continue until your cross the West Fork of Granite Creek then turn left onto Road 4S43 for 1/2 mile. Turn left onto Rd. 4S03 and drive to the mine before hiking down to the creek, or hike even further upstream. If the gate is locked just park there and hike 1/3 mile before descending to the creek. Topozone map, google map.
7270' elevation, 37 33' 01' N 119 17' 51" W

If flows are low Launch at Granite Creek Campgrounds to paddle the last and best 5 miles of the run. Topozone Map, google map.

Take - out: Drive to Clover Meadow, then backtrack 6/10 of a mile to a road heading east signed as Cassidy Trail - 5S84. Follow this dirt road for 2-3 miles staying to the right. This road gets rougher the further you go. The last 1/2 mile requires high clearance and the last 1/3 mile is a jeep road. Take out about 1/3 mile past where the Cassidy Trail crosses the creek at the eastern most point of a horseshoe Bend. Topozone map, google map.
6420' elevation.

After the take-out, this creek plummets 800 feet per mile for 3 miles into the San Joaquin Gorge near Balloon Dome.

Google Earth has high resolution images of this area showing both put-in and take-out and the creek in between.

Nearby weather stations at Graveyard Meadows and Green Mountain show temperature, precipitation and snowpack.

A streamflow gauge existed on Granite Creek from 1921 to 1986. Records for that period can be retrieved and analyzed.
Description for this creek provided primarily by Tom Hagberg, 1999.

Rapid Descriptions

Comments

No Gage

Gage Descriptions

There is at present no operating gauge on this river. There are several other online gauges which may help to estimate flows.
See NF Kings at Meadowbrook which may have a similar season.
UC San Diego Scripps Institute maintains a weather station at Devil's Postpile for use in climate research. The gauge shows water height rather than cfs. Monitor the estimate for Dinkey Creek at Dinkey Meadows which is based on the realtime flows reported for the NF Kings below Dinkey Creek at Dreamflows.com or CDEC. Tom Hagberg estimated that Granite will peak about 50% higher than Dinkey Creek. He also estimated that peak flows will be about 1 week behind Dinkey in dry years, about 2 weeks behind in normal years, and about 3 weeks behind in wet years. A streamflow gauge existed on Granite Creek from 1921 to 1986. Records for that period can be retrieved and analyzed.

Directions Description


We have no additional detail on this route. Use the map below to calculate how to arrive to the main town from your zipcode.

No Accident Reports

Alerts

News

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Sierra & Sequoia National Forest Management Plans (CA)

8/8/2019
Theresa Simsiman

The U.S. Forest Service recently released the revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) and Draft Forest Plans (DFP) for the Sierra and Sequoia National Forests. As part of this process, National Forests are required to identify the eligibility of rivers for inclusion into the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Once a river is found eligible it is managed to protect the values that support their inclusion. To that end, American Whitewater has identified recreation as an outstandingly remarkable value on many iconic whitewater rivers within the Sierra and Sequoia National Forest and is advocating for their inclusion into the inventory of eligible Wild & Scenic Rivers. Dinkey Creek Photo by Daniel Lundberg

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Help Protect S. Sierra Whitewater Rivers (CA)!

8/4/2016
Megan Hooker

This summer the Sierra, Sequoia and Inyo National Forests are seeking feedback from the public on their update and revisions to Forest Management Plans. These plans set the stage for how the forest will be managed for the next 20 years. Unfortunately, the agency's draft analysis on Wild and Scenic Rivers has largely neglected whitewater recreation values of classic whitewater rivers, including Dinkey Creek. Paddler's voices are important in this process! The deadline to comment is August 25th.

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AW Recommends California Rivers for Wild and Scenic

2/9/2016
Megan Hooker

Last week, American Whitewater recommended that the U.S. Forest Service assess whether numerous whitewater rivers in California are eligible for Wild and Scenic status. The agency is currently revising Forest Plans for the Inyo, Sequoia and Sierra National Forests, and this process provides an opportunity to evaluate rivers for whether they are eligible for Wild and Scenic designation. If a river is found eligible through this process, the Forest Service protects the values that could make it worthy for Wild and Scenic designation, including its free-flowing characteristics. 
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Paul Martzen

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Jacob Cruser

Revisions

Revision #Revision DateAuthorComment
1213172 07/03/19 Paul Martzen updated image position
1194380 01/30/07 Paul Martzen n/a
1213171 07/03/19 Paul Martzen updated image position
1213173 07/03/19 Paul Martzen updated image position
1213495 08/16/19 Paul Martzen updated image position
1213496 08/16/19 Jacob Cruser updated description
1213497 08/16/19 Jacob Cruser updated image position
1213498 08/16/19 Jacob Cruser updated image position