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Difficulty V
Length 1 Miles
Gauge N/A
Flow Range N/A
Reach Info Last Updated 04/18/2014 11:51 am

River Description


Potash Brook is a tiny class V creek that dumps into the Westfield River in Blandford, MA at the junction of routes 20 and 23 (Westfield Road & Blandford Road).  The takeout is at the confluence with the Westfield River, at Woronoco Road.  The put-in is a mile or so up route 23, on the right just after the road crosses the creek (and just before the road crosses I-90).

Google Map Potash Creek

This run is very rarely runnable.  It requires large amounts of rain, and drains almost immediately after the rain stops.  It also collects wood.

That being said, if you are lucky enough to catch it, this is one of the best runs in New England.  It is steep.  It has two big drops and many small drops, most of which blend together for a very challenging run.  

The run starts with some class 3 ledges.  Boat scouting should be sufficient as wood is the only concern.

The first significant drop is a walled in class IV double drop, which drops about 10 feet total.  If you don’t like the looks of this one, hike out.  From here down, the river gets steep.

After a few class IV ledges, look out for the two biggest drops (which become one drop at good flows).  This is the Ice Box, and it is solid Class V.

The first is a 15’ waterfall with a very narrow entrance.  There is a small pool, a  ledge drop, then the second drop - a slide that drops about 30’ and has a giant ankle-breaking boulder splitting the flow about ⅔ of the way down.  These drops are scary but highly recommended.  There aren’t many drops like this in the northeast, especially southern New England.  

After the two big ones the character switches back to small ledge drops, though the drops are much closer together, giving the drops which would individually be class IV a very solid class V feel.  Eddys are few, swimming is not recommended, and wood is a serious concern.  There is one small drop in there where the water enters left, then goes right behind a boulder then back left.  On my first journey down Potash, I was pointed through and I got lucky.  The two who scouted the drop both pitoned on a rock just under the water.  One of them pinned and swam.  Be careful.

Near the bottom there is a small dam with a metal walking bridge over the river.  At low water, you can squeeze under the bridge and off the 8’ dam.  Continue down, paddle under the road and through the last class IV run-out back to your car.  

River description by Nate Warren.  Please contact me if you have comments or questions.

Rapid Descriptions

Comments

No Gage

Gage Descriptions

If everything else in the Westfields is flooded, Potash might have enough water.

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Directions Description


Potash Brook is a tiny class V creek that dumps into the Westfield River in Blandford, MA at the junction of routes 20 and 23 (Westfield Road & Blandford Road).  The takeout is at the confluence with the Westfield River, at Woronoco Road.  The put-in is a mile or so up route 23, on the right just after the road crosses the creek (and just before the road crosses I-90).

Google Map Potash Creek

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News

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Deerfield River (MA) Flow Studies to Explore New & Improved Boating Opportunity

2015-12-06 09:54:00-05
Robert Nasdor

In response to requests by American Whitewater, several affiliates, and other stakeholders, FERC directed Brookfield Renewable to study the impact of its hydropower operations on whitewater boating on the Deerfield River in western Massachusetts. Boating groups and our supporters are seeking to determine optimal whitewater boating flows from the Fife Brook Dam and whether changes in hydropower operations would enhance boating opportunities, access and navigation.

article main photo

AW Responds To Connecticut River Boating Study (MA)

2015-11-18 16:18:00-05
Robert Nasdor

American Whitewater, along with other paddling groups and outfitters, filed comments with FERC responding to the Whitewater Boating Evaluation at Turners Falls on the Connecticut River. The study showed that there is strong demand for boating on this section of the Connecticut River if sufficient flows, scheduled releases, better access, and real-time information are provided. The groups filed the comments in order to provide additional information for the environmental review and to respond to the unsupported statements by FirstLight, the utility performing the study, claiming that there is little demand for boating at Turners Falls.

article main photo

Bellows Falls (VT) Flow Study Reveals Hidden Whitewater

2015-06-02 15:57:00-04
Robert Nasdor

A hardy group of northeast boaters climbed into the natural river channel below a hydropower dam to participate in a flow study designed to assess whether whitewater flows should be restored to this dewatered river reach on the Connecticut River. While significant obstacles remain, this site has the potential for providing instruction, playboating, and a big water feature that that could be run throughout much of the year and provide a much needed boost to the local economy. 

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Matt Muir

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Nathan Warren