Old browser warning

Site look funky?  Your browser is either Internet Explorer (hit refresh (F5) several times due to a bug in Microsoft's code that we can't work around) or is 10 years old and standards-based layouts and styling confuse it.   Consider updating.  One excellent option is Mozilla Firefox, versions of which are available for Linux, Mac and Windows. Safari 1.0+ and IE 6.0+ are also supported.

Gauge Information

Gauge Description:

There has to be a large enough snow pack to make this run feasible.   Snotel - Utah shows weather information, precipitation and snow water content at 3 sites in the Escalante drainage.   All of these stations are on the Aquarius Plateau which forms the northern boundary of the Escalante drainage.  Much of this Plateau ranges from 9,000 to 11,000 feet in elevation. 
Widstoe#3, is near the headwaters of Hall Creek, a main tributary west of town.  Snow Water Content at this station may need to be 12 inches or higher.   Over 20 inches is good.
Clayton Springs  is near the headwaters of North Creek, also a main tributary west of town.   Snow Water Content at this station may need to be 13 inches or higher.   Over 20 inches is good.
Donkey Reservoir is near the headwaters of Boulder and Deer Creek, the major tributary below highway 12.  Snow Water Content at this station may need to be above 10 inches.   

 

The USGS  Escalante stream gage is upstream of the put in, just outside of the town.  The gage is just below the confluence with Pine Creek,   Death Hollow and Sand Creek are tributaries which enter the Escalante, below the gage but upstream of the put in.  Calf Creek at the put in, has a small drainage area.   Boulder Creek runs into the Escalante a few miles downstream of highway 12, and appears to be a major source of flow.    Deer creek is a major tributary of Boulder Creek.  The flow gages on Boulder and Deer creeks no longer operate but some historical data is available.   The Gulch and Horse Canyon also have high headwaters and may supply significant flow.  

Peak flows in the Escalante can be very high (1,000 to 4,000 cfs), but they happen during summer and fall thunderstorms rather than during the spring snowmelt. 
Table of Monthly Mean Flows gives some indication of wet and dry years and months with highest flows.

Gauge Information

Name Range Difficulty Updated Level
ESCALANTE RIVER NEAR ESCALANTE, UT
usgs-09337500 2.20 - 3.45 ft II(III) 00h54m 1.24 ft (too low)

RangeWater LevelDifficultyComment
2.20 -2.67 ft barely runnable-perfect runnable II(III) About 50 to 100 cfs, Barely runnable, expect dragging
2.70 -3.45 ft med runnable-a bit pushy runnable II(III) Equivalent to 100 - 300 cfs

Report - Reports of Escalante 01. Highway 12 to Lake Powell and related gauges

Reports give the public a chance to report on river conditions throughout the country as well as log the history of a river.

Reports

When River/Gauge Subject Level Reporter
Escalante [UT] 2 Miles Left n/a Chad Farr
8y181d10h21m @Escalante Highway 12 to Lake Powell [UT] Escalante 2009 low runnable level Joseph Catlett
8y182d10h21m @Escalante Highway 12 to Lake Powell [UT] Escalante 2009 low runnable level Joseph Catlett
8y183d10h22m @Escalante Highway 12 to Lake Powell [UT] Escalante 2009 low runnable level Joseph Catlett
8y183d10h23m @Escalante Highway 12 to Lake Powell [UT] Escalante 2009 low runnable level Joseph Catlett
8y184d10h23m @Escalante Highway 12 to Lake Powell [UT] Escalante 2009 low runnable level Joseph Catlett
8y185d10h25m @Escalante Highway 12 to Lake Powell [UT] Escalante 2009 low runnable level Joseph Catlett
> 10 years Escalante [UT] E. Moody Canyon Camp 500 Chad Farr