Date
Victim
Victim Age
River
Section
Location
Gage
Water Level
Difficulty
Cause Code(s)
Injury Type(s)
Factors Code(s)
Experienced/Inexperienced
Private/Commercial
Boat Type
Group Info
Other Victim Names
Status

Accident Description


The boat was a packraft

 

One dead in rafting accident on Matanuska River

By Michelle Theriault Boots

A Sutton man was killed Saturday when his inflatable kayak overturned on the Matanuska River east of Chickaloon, the Alaska State Troopers said.Troopers were called to the scene, near Mile 105 of the Glenn Highway in the Glacier View area, at 1:12 p.m. on Sunday, said trooper spokesperson Tim DeSpain.

Martin Rinke, 63, was pronounced dead at the scene, troopers said.

Troopers said Sunday that Rinke was on the river as part of a four-person group, each in their own inflatable kayak. His kayak overturned near the Lion's Head rock formation on the river, according to troopers.

Troopers had initially described the group as riding together in a raft. The group was not part of an organized tour. Nova Alaska Guides, a local rafting tour operator, volunteered to help retrieve the body, the agency said.

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that Rinke was riding in a raft with three others that overturned. He was riding alone in an inflatable kayak.

Rafters hold safety briefing following a deadly weekend incident on Matanuska River

By Dan Carpenter / Victoria Taylor | 
 

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (KTUU) A large group of experienced rafters up river from Lion's Head were preparing to navigate the Matanuska River late in the afternoon Saturday. They held a safety briefing with the knowledge of the fatality in an area they would soon be traveling.

According to the Alaska state trooper dispatch, Martin Rinke, 63, of Sutton, "succumbed to injuries received and was pronounced deceased at the scene" after the raft he was in overturned in the river near the Lion's Head. Locals said that area of the river is known to have class III and IV rapids. "This section here, there's a lot of big boulders, a lot of holes. With Alaska white water in general the thing that makes it so dangerous is they're active rivers so they're still eroding the shorelines,” Ryan Roberts said.

Roberts has ran the river for the past eight years, ”there's still a lot of trees, debris being flushed into these systems and every time you go on one it's a totally different river. You're having fun in the sun and the next think you're flipped over," Roberts said.

While using pack rafts Roberts has been flipped into the river but he says he has never flipped a larger raft. He said once it happens there may be little you can do to help someone else in trouble. "Your safety is to get to the boat so getting on top is safe,” Roberts said. Roberts said most rafts will have a line on the side, “and everyone pulls the boat back over and flips it over — which is challenging to do in the middle of a white water section," he said.

According to the AST dispatch, Rinke was navigating the river with a group of four people, each using their own inflatable kayaks.